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Self Me

wedding-rings

The Self-ME campaign celebrated the contribution Muslim women make to Scotland.

Muslim women were asked to take a selfie of them making a difference, whether it was through work, sport, charity or the arts. The pictures were followed by #MuslimsEngaging #SelfME #ScotlandisME.

Reclaim The Name

#ReclaimtheName

Here are 5 things you should know about the #ReclaimTheName campaign:

1) ReclaimTheName is about challenging stereotypes and changing perceptions

The aim of the campaign is to educate each other on the diversity in Muslim cultures and ways of life.

2) The campaign is about women reclaiming how they are defined by the world

All women are unique and individual. The campaign is working to empower all women to have their own voice and make it heard.

3) It is a pro campaign

This campaign is not about what it is like to be Muslim or experience Islamophobia, it is about Muslim women.
We hope to provide a platform where Muslim women can express their stories and illustrate their journeys to provide nuance and complexity to narratives that are associated with them.

4) Creativity is protest

We not only want to redefine disempowering messages about Muslim women, we want to support creative ways of getting those messages across.

5) Community participation is key to success

Nominate stand out women we may be missing out on and use the hashtag #ReclaimTheName to participate in our campaign.

You can watch our launch video here https://goo.gl/k7JrGc and keep up to date with the campaign on our social media

Activities:

Community Champions (Monthly) – Highlighting members of the community who inspire others (either nomination or selected by development officers)

Instagram Takeovers (Monthly) – Encouraging women/orgs to use our platform to present their thoughts on an area of expertise or passion relating to the wellbeing of women in our communities.

Infographics and Statements – Key dates i.e. Black history month, Hate Crime Awareness Week, Elections and/or unplanned events are commented on and resources linked/produced.

Accessibility in Focus (every 6 months) – Content from community members/orgs to increase awareness about experiences of additional support needs and have their voices amplified where they may be otherwise excluded.

 

“Community Champions”

We’re looking to highlight Muslim women and BME women who fall under the following broad categories (below) in an effort to recognise and celebrate the various contributions of women to the fabric of Scottish society:

1) Women who have not been recognised for the time and energy they have given to their communities in Scotland

2) Women who have raised money, awareness or interest around important topics relating to Muslim women and BME women that has affected women in Scotland.
3) Women who are in positions of representation or could be seen as role models

The campaign is carefully considered to prevent worry over the evil eye or nazr being put on them for being highlighted in this way. No pictures of individuals will be used without consent.
Community Champions will be highlighted once a month and we will be looking for nominations after this month. If someone who isn’t on social media is nominated, then we create a postcard to be sent to either the nominee or the person who has nominated them. We won’t keep details other than name and date of postage once the card has been sent.

Anyone wishing to nominate a community champion, please contact info@mwrc.org.uk with the subject heading “Community champion”, message us on social media or call us on 0141 212 8420.

You can change this

Amina MWRC is uniting the Scottish Muslim community and friends. Because together we can change this.

We are asking you to promise opposition to all forms of violence against women and girls. We are asking you to help break the silence by taking action to raise awareness and spread the word that violence against women is wrong and will not be tolerated in our community!

We are asking you to be the change you want to see in your community by making the change-maker promise and joining our change-makers of Scotland.

I speak for myself


I Speak for Myself is a national campaign that empowers Muslim women to share their personal messages with fellow Scots, so that together we can challenge damaging stereotypes.

Staggeringly,

Over 70% of secondary school young people associated words such as “Terrorist”, “Foreign”, “Oppressed” and “Uneducated” with Muslim women.

The campaign through a travelling exhibition of women’s personal messages, aims to tackle misconceptions and common stereotypes about Muslim women, thus reducing inequality and sexual discrimination not only within the Muslim community but also in the wider society.

Please fill in this survey to help us better understand your experiences with Islamophobia. We will use this data to help agencies get a better grasp of the obstacles that Muslim women face.

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Black History in Scotland: The Slave Trade

It’s important that we learn about and acknowledge this history so that we can better understand where modern day anti-black racism stems from, and its impact on current race issues across Scotland.

Scotland was a major player in the Slave Trade and the country benefited greatly from it. Much of the country as it stands today was built by slave labour. In the big cities such as Glasgow and Edinburgh especially, there remain statues and street signs that point to its often ignored past of slavery.

Scotland’s role in the historic slave trade is still only starting to become common knowledge, and it’s important that we learn about and acknowledge this history so that we can better understand where modern day anti-black racism stems from, and its impact on current race issues across Scotland.

A few key facts:

  • In 1796, Scots owned almost 30 per cent of the estates in Jamaica; By 1817 Scots owned 32 per cent of the slaves there
  • It wasn’t just the big cities that benefited; towns across Scotland were involved in the slave trade
  • Scottish surnames continue to be common in the Caribbean, especially in Jamaica
  • Bunce Island, off the coast of Sierra Leone, was run by Scot slave owners from 1728-1807
  • UK taxpayers were paying the descendants of slave owners compensation for the abolition of slavery until 2015 but the descendants of slaves in the UK have never been compensated
  • The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) was started by Scottish immigrants
  • Glasgow University is thought to be one of the first historic academic institutions to acknowledge that it benefited from the financial backing of merchants who profited from slavery

 

#BlackLivesMatter

Further Reading/Sources

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p06ptcg9

https://www.nls.uk/collections/topics/slavery

https://www.nts.org.uk/learn/downloads/Scotland%20and%20the%20SlaveTrade.pdf

https://www.glasgowlive.co.uk/news/history/slave-trade-history-merchant-city-15334915

https://www.blackhistorymonth.org.uk/article/section/history-of-slavery/scotland-and-slavery/

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/search/https://blog.historicenvironment.scot/2018/11/edinburghs-part-slave-trade/

https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/17200038.how-slavery-made-the-modern-scotland/

https://blog.nls.uk/mapping-slavery/

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/maps/https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/https://www.blackpast.org/

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/scots-hidden-kkk-shame-8l2hjlzpz

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07yjk0jhttps://www.theguardian.com/world/1999/jan/30/3

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/taxpayers-still-paying-british-slave-12019829

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/britains-colonial-shame-slave-owners-given-huge-payouts-after-abolition-8508358.html

https://www.gla.ac.uk/news/headline_667960_en.html

Coalition for Race Equality and Rights – https://www.crer.scot/

Books on Slavery and Scotland

It Wisnae Us – The Truth about Glasgow and Slavery
Stephen Mullen

Recovering Scotland’s Slavery Past: The Caribbean Connection
T.M. Devine

Scotland and the Abolition of Black Slavery, 1756-183
Iain Whyte

Meaningful Action you Can Take

Commit to action to show your solidarity with the #BlackLivesMatter movement and anti-racism.

There are many ways you can do this:

  • Show your support online – but be wary of overcrowding the streams with messages of support rather than using it to help amplify Black voices and share resources. ‘Clicktivism’ is a start, but should be followed through with action IRL
  • Sign petitions online that have a global (or local) reach
  • Shop at  black-owned businesses. Just some examples, but research ones in your city:
  • Contribute to a bail fund for protesters that are risking getting arrested by being on the ground, protesting, protecting vulnerable people, including Black communities, at rallies. Here are just a few options:
  • Write to your MPs! Demand that the UK stop selling gear to aid in US Police violently responding to protesters, to condemn President Trump’s use of force against citizens
  • Donate to grassroots Black-led charities, including Black Lives Matter (makes sure to check which charities are most in need of funds. Black-led charities will let you know where funds may be required)
  • Educate yourself and others on issues of racism, the difference between non-racism and anti-racism. Do the work! Don’t expect Black activists to point you in the right direction, when you can find sources everywhere to listen/read/watch. Talk to others about it and share resources
    • Books
      • White Fragility – Robin Diangelo
      • So You Want to Talk About Race – Ijeoma Olua
      • How to be an Anti-Racist – Ibram X. Kendi
      • The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness – Michelle Alexander
      • The Vanishing Half – Brit Bennett
      • Between the World and Me – Ta-Nehisi Coates
      • I Am Enough – Grace Byers
      • Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? – Beverly Daniel Tatum
      • Me and White Supremacy: Combat Racism, Change the World and Become a Good Ancestor -Layla Saad
      • Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race – Reni Eddo-Lodge
      • Natives: Race & Class in the Ruins of Empire – Akala
      • The Good Immigrant – Edited by Nikesh Shukla
      • Black Listed – Jeffrey Boakye
      • Shame on Me – Tessa McWatt
    • Podcasts
      • About Race
      • Gal Dem
      • The Diversity Gap
      • Pod for the Cause
      • Black Gals Livin’
      • Witness Black History (BBC)
      • Black British History (BBC)
      • The Black Curriculum
      • We Need to Talk About the British Empire
      • Why the Windrush Scandal was no Accident
      • No Country for Young Women
      • Code Switch
      • 1619
      • Say Your Mind
      • This is Spoke
      • and many more….
    • Films/TV
      • Selma
      • I Am Not Your Negro
      • 13th
      • See You Yesterday
      • When They See Us
      • Hidden Figures
      • The Hate U Give
      • Fruitvale Station

#BlackLivesMatter

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